Author Archives: lavitaminat

Guacamole… Valle de Guadalupe Style A Recipe by Chef Bossuet

 

Photo Credit: Lozhka Bistrot

Photo Credit: Lozhka Bistrot

 

This is one of my favorite souvenirs to our trip to Valle de Guadalupe in September.

Yields 4 cups

Ingredients

  • 5 pieces avocado (Hass)
  • 1 cup of brunoise Roma tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup of white onion finely chopped
  • 1/3 cup of Serrano fresh chili
  • 2 tbs of cilantro finely chopped
  • 4 tbs of lime juice
  • Salt t.t.
  • 1/2 cup of table grapes cut in half
  • 1/3 cup of fresh ranchero cheese

Directions

  • In a bowl add the mashed avocado pulp, and mix the tomato, onion,  chili, lime juice and salt.
  • Add ranchero cheese and grapes on top.
  • Enjoy with fresh corn tortilla or tortilla chips.
  • Pair with Rosayoff, Bibayoff
Chef Bossuet´s Kitchen at Loshka Bistort

Chef Bossuet´s Kitchen at Loshka Bistort

Celebrated Mexican chef  José Bossuet Martinez,  former Executive Chef of Mexican ex-president Vicente Fox,  is member of the world’s most prestigious association   “Le Club des Chefs des Chefs”, which exclusive membership is reserved for those who are personal chefs of heads of state.

Today, chef Bossuet treats lucky patrons ´like kings´ at Lozhka Bistrot in Valle de Guadalupe, Baja California and Café Contento in Guanajuato. José Bossuet is an author, an educator and an extraordinary representative of Mexican gastronomy. Beyond that, he is a proud showcase of Mexico’s ingenuity, its entrepreneurship, its heart and its undeniable talent.

 

 

 

 

 

s.

Nuestra Mesa – Receta para Hacer Pan de Muerto

Foto: Manuel Rivera Ciudad de México, México

 

CLICK TO SEE THIS RECIPE IN ENGLISH

Con las celebraciones del Día de Muertos a la vuelta de la esquina, pensamos en traerles la receta para hacer un tradicional, delicioso e indispensable pan de muerto.

Esta receta requiere dejar reposar los primeros ingredientes durante un día, así que si piensan hacerla, les recomendamos prepararla con tiempo suficiente.

Rinde para 45 panes de 100 gr. cada uno o un pan familiar de aproximadamente 4.5 kilos.

Paso 1:

Ingredientes

  • 120 gr. levadura fresca (usa 1/3 de la cantidad si es que piensas usar levadura artificial)
  • 340 ml. de agua
  • 400 gr. de harina

Proceso

  1. Entibia el agua en el microondas
  2. Revuelve los ingredientes con el agua hasta formar una masa
  3. Deja reposar la masa por un dia entero en un recipiente engrasado con aceite. Cubre el recipiente con plástico y colócalo en un lugar fresco.

Paso 2:

Ingredientes

  • 32 huevos
  • 320 gr. azúcar
  • 2.250 kg harina
  • 40 gr. de sal
  • 1 kg. mantequilla
  • 4 cucharadas de agua de azahar

Proceso

  1. Incorpora los primeros cuatro ingredientes con el agua de azahar,  hasta formar una masa homogénea y que no se pegue.
  2. Agrega la masa que preparaste un día anterior sigue amasando hasta que este bien incorporada.
  3. Deja que la mantequilla esté a temperatura ambiente y  agrégala en trozos de alrededor de 100 gr.  hasta integrarla toda.
  4. Forma bolas  de 100 gr si quieres hacer porciones individuales y de 400 gr.  para hacer un pan familiar.
  5. Forma los huesitos con pedazos pequeños de masa, Las puedes rodar en la mesa y aplanarla con los dedos.

Foto: Manuel Rivera – Ciudad de México, México

6. Barniza con yema de huevo y deja fermentar durante una hora.

Foto: Manuel Rivera – Ciudad de México, México

7. Mete tu mezcla a hornear a 200 grados hasta que los panes estén de  color café claro

8. Saca tus panes del horno y déjalos enfriar.

9. Derrite mantequilla y barniza con ella los panes. Después espolvoréalos con azúcar refinada hasta que queden cubiertos

¡Acompaña tu pan con un buen chocolate!

El chef Aldo Saavedra ha cocinado para huéspedes de establecimientos como el conocido Hotel Condesa D.F. y ha contribuído con sus recetas en proyectos con marcas de la talla de Larousse y Danone. En Nuestra Mesa, el chef Saavedra comparte con los lectores de La Vitamina T, su pasión por la cocina y por México.

¡’Biba’ México! The Zeal Behind Mexico’s Pasión Biba (The First in a Series)

 

Photo Credit: Pasión Biba

Photo Credit: Pasión Biba

From the Series “World Class: Mexican Wine and the Hands who Make it”

Photos: Enrico Bellomo/Brenda Storch

 

I became fascinated by Valle de Guadalupe’s cuisine while following the recent opening of  Lozhka Bistrot,  a partnership between Pasión Biba’s Abel Bibayoff and celebrated chef José Bossuet. It was not until I spoke with Chef that I realized this prosperous little town, barely two hours south of San Diego, had been colonized by a group of Eastern European immigrants known as Molokans. In the early 1900s, fifty Molokan families fleeing from the Russian Orthodox Church sought refuge in this idyllic town. Serendipitously, while the Mexican government granted the colonizers permission to establish themselves and to own land,  the story of Mexican wine found a way to not “die on the vine.”

Gratefully.

Aside from tending to grapes and making wine, the new settlers introduced commodities that included geese, beehives, grains, cooking and farming techniques. Molokans forever changed the phenotype of Valle de Guadalupe, including its gastronomy.

Photo: Brenda Storch

Lozhka Bistrot is a brilliant, almost poetic summary of what this town is about- a contemporary, singular take on double the fusion (novo-Hispanic cuisine with Russian influences) where dual identities abound.  Visitors of Valle de Guadalupe will be equally delighted with airy Molokan bread, and pan dulce.

At Lozhka, for example, I had the most memorable duck enmoladas.  Bossuet explained the protein is a nod to the use of geese favored by Molokan settlers, replacing the more traditional use of chicken in this dish. If you visit Lozhka, Chef recommends pairing this glorious plate with Pasión Biba’s Zinfandel 2010.

During my stay, I heard the story of a lady who makes tamales out of Varenyky dough. I could not confirm whether or not this is just an urban legend, but after all, this is Mexico.  Here, anything is possible.

Photo Credit: Brenda Storch

Duck Enmoladas at Lozhka Bistrot

Among a host of delicacies that words will only fall short to describe,  I was treated to the most unforgettable compote made with yellow watermelons and freshly-picked tomatoes.

Chef Bossuet and One of His Irresistible Creations: Watermelon and Tomato Compote

Chef Bossuet and one of his irresistible creations: watermelon and tomato compote.

Farm-to-table is Valle de Guadalupe’s bread and butter. Many of the vineyard owners have partnered with well-renowned chefs to offer a complete culinary experience. Thanks to this effort, the  collection of elevated eateries in this area is a true gem.

Freshly Harvested Yellow Watermelon Finds a Way to Your Table (and Your Heart) at Lozhka Bistrot

Freshly harvested yellow watermelon finds a way to your table (and your heart) at Lozhka Bistrot.

Past and future juxtapose in every detail- Lozhka means ‘spoon’ in Russian and the name of the restaurant is an homage to Abel Bibayoff’s grandfather Alexei, one of the Molokan founders of this town. In the halls of the family’s small museum, where handmade ‘loshkas‘ lie close to a few samovars, we see the next generation of Bibayoffs happily sleeping in a baby carriage.

It is very clear that tradition is a lifestyle for the Bibayoff family- it is tangible matter.  It is alive. Viva.

Alexei Bibayoff's Spoon or "Lozhka".

Alexei Bibayoff’s Spoon or “Lozhka”.

After having the good fortune to be guided (by none other than Abel Bibayoff himself) through the process in which vines are coaxed into grapes and then turned into wine,  the name of his label, “Pasión Biba” resonates.  This play on words, which phonetically means “live passion”, says it all.

Pasión Biba's Abel Bibayoff

Pasión Biba’s Abel Bibayoff

There are years of character, generational zeal and know-how in his wine. Each drop is nurtured, loved, intimately known. If it were possible, each would have a name that over and over again, would translate into ‘passion’. In every drop, Pasión Biba.

¡Biba México!

Lozhka Bistrot is open Wednesdays – Mondays 1o:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Learn more about Pasión Biba

How to get there:

Map by Pasión Biba.

Map courtesy of Pasión Biba.

 

 

Death is a Party: El Día de Muertos

  

“The Mexican is familiar with death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, and celebrates it. It is one of his favorite playthings and his most steadfast love.”   

-Octavio Paz

Photos: Lissette Storch – Puebla, Mexico

 

Death is a verb and a noun.

In Mexico, death is an ultimate experience of life, and in what seems to be a constant attempt to make it look approachable, we have made her look human and we have dressed her up; we have given her nicknames, le hablamos de tú*.

Death is a ‘she’.

Originally, sugar skulls were created as a reminder of the fact that death  awaits us at any turn, and it is one of  the many expressions of our inevitable relationship with “the lady with many names”: La Catrina (“the rich or elegant one”), La Tía de las Muchachas (“the girls’ aunt”), La Fría (“the cold one”), La Novia Blanca (“the white bride”). Death is a character that wanders amongst us.

Death is life.

Like any other Mexican celebration, food is at the center of el Día de Muertos. Along with pan de muerto (literally, “bread of dead”) and cempasúchil flowers, sugar skulls are staples of this festivity. It is virtually impossible to stumble upon any particular element of  el Día de Muertos that does not have a deliberate purpose or meaning. From the bread that symbolizes the circle of life and communion with the body of the dead, to the flowers that make a nod to the ephemeral nature of life, this ritual, especially in rural Mexico, is rich in both form and content.

I grew up in the city, and for the most part, I participated in these festivities as a spectator. It was not until my grandmother died a few years ago, when my uncle and my mother took over perpetuating this three-thousand-year-old tradition, that I became involved and more intrigued by it.

Year after year, the family travels to a small village in the outskirts of Puebla to  set up an ofrenda for my grandmother, my great-grandmother, and other deceased  relatives. They are remembered with their favorite food and dishes. My grandmother  for example, loved to cook, so aside from prepared meals, her favorite kitchen tools are also set around her picture.

Candles are used either as symbol of hope and faith, or as a way to light the path of the dead as they descend. Water is included to quench the thirst of the souls, and as a symbol of purity. With these ofrendas, the dead  are remembered and invoked.

The celebration continues in the cemetery, where the living and the souls eat together, listen to music, and even enjoy fireworks.

For a few days in November, in Mexico, death is a party.

The cementery of San Francisco Acatepec, where my grandmother is buried.

Hablar de tú‘ means to address someone casually, vs. the respectfully ‘usted’ that is reserved to address those who you don’t know or those who haven’t granted you permission to do otherwise.

 

World Class: Mexican Wine and the Hands who Make It (Introduction to a Series)

Photo: Enrico Bellomo

Photo: Enrico Bellomo

Mexico has been producing wine since the 16th century. Legend tells of Hernán Cortés  demanding that grapevines be brought to the Nueva España to be grown after the Spanish wine supply was depleted during the celebration of the defeat of the Mexica empire.  In an interesting turn of events, Mexican wine happened to be so good, that the Spanish Crown banned its production other than for liturgical use.

In 1843 Dominican priests  from the Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe del Norte mission, discovered that superior quality grapes faired well in the valley’s mediterranean microclimate. Today, 90% of all Mexican wine is produced in this area. Sadly, not many Mexicans drink it.

We are back from a visit to what is known today as Valle de Guadalupe, México’s wine country. We were drawn by Lozhka Bistrot, the most recent project by beloved Mexican gastronome Chef José Bossuet, and Pasión Biba’s Abel Bibayoff.  Our gracious hosts delighted us with a tour featuring a variety of wineries where the production ranges from  artisanal to massive.

The time we spent with the winemakers left a lasting impression- a shapshot of the Mexico only a few have a chance to palate. From mathematicians, to astronomers, enologists, plastic artists and restaurateurs, the people behind the wine that is produced in Valle de Guadalupe explains why this wine is so extraordinary.  Here, passion runs deep, as does a profound, almost spiritual commitment to making the best wine. Every time.

In the upcoming weeks we will be writing a series based on our experience at each winery: Pasión Biba/Bibayoff, Alximia, Torres Alegre and Las Nubes.  This is our humble tribute to remarkable wine and to the hands who make it.

Next article in the series: ¡´Biba´México! The Zeal Behind Mexico´s Pasión Biba  

 

 

 

Chiles en Nogada: Un Plato que Grita Independencia

Photo Credit: Lissette Storch - Mexico City, Mexico

Foto: Lissette Storch – Ciudad de Mèxico

Literalmente chiles en salsa de nuez o “nogada”, este plato se atribuye a la creatividad culinaria propia del estado de Puebla, y se dice que los chiles en nogada fueron servidos por primera vez en el siglo XIX para celebrar la independencia de México.

Mitad plegaria, mitad receta, cuenta la historia que las monjas agustinas de Atlixco, Puebla, improvisaron este platillo en honor del caudillo Agustín de Yturbide, quien durante su viaje a la Ciudad de México desde Veracruz, se detuvo en Puebla tras firmar el Tratado de Córdoba. Este documento establecía la independencia de México, es por eso que los colores del Ejército Trigarante, y ahora también los de la bandera mexicana, están representados en este plato.

Mitad guerrero, mitad ángel, esta delicia exige que al chile poblano se le de vida con un corazón hecho a base de carne, frutas y semillas disponibles en México durante el mes de septiembre, incluyendo pera, durazno, manzana y piñón. Para rematar, la salsa de nuez que le da nombre al plato es muy delicada, y está acentuada con semillas de granada.

Mitad indígena, mitad español, esta creación es completamente mexicana y no puedes dejar de probarla.

En caso de que quieras recrear esta joya culinaria en casa, nuestro amigo, el chef Moisés Salazar, nos deleita con esta receta. El chef nos dice que como este platillo siempre es un éxito, generalmente él no cocina otro plato salado.

Rinde para 8-12 personas.

  1. Limpia 20 chiles para rellenar.
  2. Seca el interior de los chiles y rellénelos con el picadillo. Si
    sientes que el picadillo es muy pesado o los chiles están muy
    abiertos, ciérralos con un palillo

PICADILLO

Ingredientes:

• 3/4 de taza de aceite de maiz
• 6 dientes de ajo cortados por la mitad
• 1 taza de cebolla finamente picada
• 2 lbs de carne de cerdo molida (pasada por el molino una sola vez)
• 2 cucharaditas de sal
• 1 taza de agua
• 3 cucharadas de aceite de maíz
• 2 lb de jitomate licuado y colado
• 1/2 taza de almendras peladas y partidas por mitad
• 3/4 taza de pasitas negras picadas
• 20 aceitunas verdes enjuagadas y cortadas en cuatro
• 2 cucharadas de perejil fresco finamente picado
• 4 clavos de olor
• 1 vara de canela de 3 cm de largo
• 1 oz granos de pimienta negra
• 1/4 taza de aceite de maíz para freír las frutas
• 4 tazas de manzana  en cubitos
• 4 tazas de peras en cubitos
• 4 tazas de duraznos amarillos en cubitos
• 1 cucharada de azúcar
• 2 tazas de aceite para freír los plátanos
• 4 tazas de plátano macho en cubitos
• 1 taza de acitrón en cubitos (1 cuadro de acitrón)
• 3oz de piñones rosas, pelados
• 2 cucharadas de vinagre blanco

Procedimiento:

  1.  En 1/4 de taza de aceite fríe 2 dientes de ajo hasta que queden
    totalmente dorados (deséchelos); acitrona la cebolla, añade la carne,
    la sal y el agua, tapa y cuece todo hasta que la carne esté tierna,
    aproximadamente 5 minutos. Destapa para que toda el agua se evapore y
    de ser posible la carne se dore un poco.
  2.  En otro sartén, calienta las otras 3 cucharadas de aceite, dora 2
    dientes de ajo y deséchalos. Acitrona la cebolla restante, añade el
    jitomate y deja sazonar, agrega las almendras, las pasas, las
    aceitunas y el perejil, y deja sazonar la mezcla por 2 minutos.
  3. Muele el clavo, la canela y las pimientas, añádaselos al jitomate y
    retira el sartén del fuego.
  4. Añade la mezcla de jitomate a la carne y deja que se sazone por 5
    minutos, retira del fuego.
  5. En otro sartén, calienta el otro 1/4 de taza de aceite, dora en él 2
    ajos, deséchalos y fríe la manzana, la pera y el durazno, tapa y deja
    que se frían y cuezan. No dejes que se deshagan, la fruta debe quedar
    entera. Añade el azúcar y en el caso de que las frutas estén ácidas,
    añádalas más azúcar, pues la mezcla debe ser dulce.
  6. Por separado, fríe el plátano hasta que se dore ligeramente, reserva
    el aceite sobrante para freír los chiles.
  7.  Mezcla con la carne las frutas, el plátano, el acitrón, los piñones
    y el vinagre. El picado no debe quedar deshecho.

CAPEADO

Ingredientes:
• 12 huevos, separados claras de las yemas
• 1/4 de taza de harina
• 2 cucharaditas de sal
• 1 taza de harina para revolcar los chiles
• 2 tazas de aceite de maíz (más el que reservó para freír los plátanos)

Procedimiento:

El chef sugiere que el capeado se haga en dos etapas, sobre todo si quien cocina tiene
poca experiencia.

  1. Bate las claras hasta que hagan picos suaves, añade las yemas, la sal
    y el 1/4 de taza de harina. Bate hasta que todos los ingredientes
    estén incorporados.
  2. Revuelqua los chiles en la harina y quítales el exceso golpeándolos
    con la mano suavemente, pues sólo sirve para que se adhiera bien el
    huevo.
  3. Calienta el aceite con el que freíste el plátano en un sartén amplio
    (conforme vayas necesitando más aceite, añádelo). Deja que humée
    ligeramente; sumerge los chiles en el huevo y fríelos uno por uno.
  4. Mientras se dora ligeramente la parte de abajo del chile, con la ayuda
    de una pala o espátula, baña la parte de arriba para que éste se dore y
    no sea necesario voltearlo. Si no tienes experiencia, voltéalo.

Escúrrelos sobre servilletas de papel para quitarles el exceso de
grasa del capeado. Manténlos tibios o a temperatura ambiente y
reserve.

NOGADA

Ingredientes:
• 1 taza de almendras peladas y remojadas en agua
• 5 tazas de agua fría
• 1 lb grs de queso de cabra o de queso fresco
• 8 tazas de nueces de Castilla limpias (2.5 lbs aprox)

Procedimiento:

  1. De preferencia remoja las almendras una o dos noches con antelación
    con agua fría y manténlas en el refrigerador. Nota como al hidratarse,
    aumentan de tamaño y adquieren un tono color marfil. Esto hace que su sabor se
    haga muy parecido al de la nuez fresca.
  2. Mezcla todos los ingredientes en un tazón, excepto el agua, licúa la
    mitad de la mezcla y luego la otra para evitar que se derrame el vaso
    de la licuadora, utiliza el agua necesaria, utilizarás casi toda,
    aunque la salsa no es aguada y debe tener consistencia (esta receta es
    exacta, por lo que se recomienda no alterar las cantidades).

PRESENTACIÓN

Ingredientes:
• 2 granadas rojas desgranadas (2 tazas de granos)
• Ramas de perejil para adornar

Procedimiento:

  1. Coloca los chiles en un platón.
  2. Baña parcialmente los chiles con la
    nogada, pues se debe ver algo de capeado.
  3. Adorna con las hojas de
    perejil y la granada.

Chef Moisés Salazar

El chef Moisés Salazar es un mexicano experto en Alta Cocina, dedicado al catering corporativo y privado. Su pasión lo ha llevado desde Belize, donde estuvo a cargo de delegaciones diplomáticas  de la Embajada de México, Estados Unidos y varios países centroamericanos, hasta Atlanta, donde colaboró en el famoso St. Regis.  Encuentra más información sobre el chef Moisés Salazar y su contribución al  mundo de la gastronomía en su sitio web: www.chefmoises.com

Haz click aquí para encontrar otra magnífica receta para hacer chiles en nogada, inspirada por las monjas de la órden de las Clarisas, quienes se dedican a elaborar este platillo desde 1924.

 

Comida de Ángeles: Buñuelos de Requesón

Foto: Chef Victoria del Ángel

Foto: Chef Victoria del Ángel

No deja de asombrarme cómo es que apenas se puede rasgar la superficie cuando se intenta explorar uno de los muchos ángulos que posée la comida mexicana. Hace unos días, por ejemplo, tuvimos el placer de platicar con la chef Victoria del Ángel, quien trajo a colación el tema de la comida conventual. Como su nombre lo dice, los platillos conventuales fueron conjurados en las cocinas de las órdenes de religiosos establecidos en la Nueva España y son extraordinarios ejemplares de la incipiente cultura novohispana, incluyendo su gastronomía de fusión.

Mitad plegaria y mitad poesía, la comida conventual encuentra uno de sus detonadores en la creatividad de los misioneros quienes al enfrentarse con la falta de carne y otros elementos típicos de su cocina, se ven obligados a incorporar ingredientes y técnicas locales en su gastronomía. Muchos de estos platillos, incluyendo los chiles en nogada, son ilustres y apreciados exponentes de este fenómeno, y tal como el pueblo que los vio nacer, son mitad españoles y mitad indígenas.

Durante nuestra conversación, y para ilustrar los platos propios de esta cocina, la chef del Ángel nos agasajó con una receta de nada más y nada menos que Juana de Asbaje.

Siglos después de la muerte de esta intelectual y poetisa mexicana, el libro Sor Juana en la cocinade Mónica Lavín y Ana Benítez rescata el recetario que la “décima musa” dedicara a su hermana, para quien cocinaba con frecuencia.

Según la chef del Ángel, “el recetario es un conjunto de notas que Sor Juana escribió para si misma, por lo que representa cierta complejidad de interpretación.  las cantidades de la receta a continuación,  han sido adaptadas a nuestra época.”

Buñuelos de Requesón

Ingredientes

  • 3 tazas de harina,
  • 225 gramos de requesón
  •  6 yemas o un huevo
  • una taza de manteca o aceite para freír
  • azúcar y canela.

Procedimiento:

  1. Mezcla los ingredientes, amasa durante 5 minutos y deja reposar la mezcla durante media hora en el refrigerador.
  2. Extiende la masa y córtala en círculos
  3. Fríe y dejar escurrir en papel absorbente.
  4. Espolvorea con azúcar y canela

 

La chef Victoria del Ángel  descubrió su pasión por la cocina desde los tres años. Fascinada por la repostería y gastronomía mexicanas, decidió perseguir la licenciatura en gastronomía en la Escuela Superior de Gastronomía, y más tarde un postgrado en repostería en la Universidad de Artes culinarias y Tendencias Europeas, otorgado por el Culinary Institute Switzerland de Suiza. Victoria es dueña de la chocolatería Xocolat del Ángel en Jilotepec, México.

Estampas de Mi Ciudad – The Ubiquitous Street Quesadilla Stand

Street Quesadilla Stand Photo: Guillermo Chan – Mexico City

A sampling of Mexico´s mestizo nature in a bite, (the fusion concept of a quesadilla already combines the Spanish word for “queso” with the Aztec word “tortilla“) try a chorizo and cheese quesadilla. More pre-Hispanic stuffings include flor de calabaza (zucchini blossoms) or huitlacoche (corn fungus). The latter might not sound too terribly appealing, but trust me, there is a reason why Mexicans have consider it a treat for centuries.

You will never go hungry in Mexico City, where quesadillassopes and other garnachas* are easily found street-side and served either as a snack or a meal. Filled with a variety of stuffings ranging from flowers and vegetables, to meat and even insects, these portable pockets of pure joy are a staple of any modern Mexican meal.

 

*Garnachas: Slang term for comfort-food, usually made out of corn on a comal.

Quesadilla: More than Cheese Meets the Tortilla

Photo: Lissette Storch Correspondent in Mexico City, Mexico

Delicious quesadillas made with blue-corn tortillas materialize right in front of patrons’ eyes in La Marquesa, Mexico. Photo: Lissette Storch

You will never go hungry in Mexico City, where quesadillas, sopes and other garnachas* are easily found street-side and served either as a snack or a meal. Filled with a variety of stuffings ranging from flowers and vegetables, to meat and even insects, these portable pockets of pure joy are a staple of any modern Mexican meal. Given the apparent simplicity of their execution, it would be easy to assume that quesadillas are predictable and uninteresting, but skilled artisan hands bring these delicacies to life in such way, that defeños** will consider traveling to indulge in a perfect one. La Marquesa, a national park west of Mexico City, is a popular weekend getaway as well as a quesadilla haven. Here, locals and visitors are able to choose from a multitude of establishments offering a variety of quesadillas among other local delicacies that include trout and even rabbit.

For a sampling of Mexico´s mestizo nature in a bite, (the fusion concept of a quesadilla already combines the Spanish word for “queso” with the Aztec word “tortilla“) try a chorizo and cheese quesadilla. More pre-Hispanic stuffings include flor de calabaza (zucchini blossoms) or huitlacoche (corn fungus). The latter might not sound too terribly appealing, but trust me, there is a reason why Mexicans have consider it a treat for centuries.

If you are in Mexico City and the foodie in you wants to venture to La Marquesa, we recommend making a day trip out of this culinary excursion. Consider hiring a reputable cab company to drive you to and from the food area. La Marquesa is about an hour away from downtown Mexico City.

*Garnachas: Slang term for comfort-food, usually made out of corn on a comal.

**Defeño: A citizen of Mexico City.

 

Priest, Peasant, Pop Icon: Pulque

Photo credit: Emma Victoria del Ángel

Pulque Coconut Curado. Photo: Victoria del Ángel

 

When trying to talk about pulque, it is only possible to scratch the surface. An ancient fermented drink made with nectar from 12-year old agave plants, this milky alcoholic substance has a soap opera-worthy history. Once a prominent sacred potion, and esteemed secular remedy to which aphrodisiac and extraordinary nutritious properties were attributed, pulque has also gone from being anything from the stigma of the demons of a caste, to the protagonist of the movement of Mexican independence.

500 years later, and after enduring both the rejection and nationalistic embrace of its own people, this drink continues to be a relevant part of Mexican life and popular folklore. In the early 1900s, more than one thousand pulquerías peppered the streets of Mexico City, with catchy, tongue-in-cheek names reflecting the innate humor of Defeño* social dynamics- “The Other Church”, “A Lady’s Belch”, “Better Here than There” (for an establishment across from a cemetery). Also, many of them are hosts to quite a collection of Mexican art.

Although today pulque is consumed primarily in rural areas where its  complex drinking and serving etiquette lives on, there seems to be a movement of resurgence in Mexico City. Tasting tours are now also available.

Because the drink is fermented, selling it in cans is impractical, but may still be found. The best pulque is freshly fermented, and it is usually enjoyed by itself or mixed with fruits, in which case it is called curado. I have not stumbled upon pulque breweries in Chicago, but then again, I have not purposefully looked for them either yet, although I have read about people who brew their own for personal consumption. If you are outside of Mexico and know where to find pulque, here is chef Victoria del Ángel’s recipe to make your own coconut curado:

Curado de Coco

4 cups of fresh pulque
 1 cup of shredded coconut
1 can of creme of coconut
 Sugar to taste

Directions:

  1. Mix all the ingredients in a blender slowly incorporating the pulque.
  2. Refrigerate for 30-60 minutes.
  3. Serve.

*Defeños are citizens of Mexico City

Chef Victoria del Ángel discovered her passion for cooking at the age of three. Fascinated by Mexican cuisine, she obtained a degree in gastronomy by the Escuela Superior de Gastronomía in Mexico and a graduate degree by the Culinary Institute of Switzerland. Currently, Victoria is the owner of a chocolate boutique,  Xocolat del Ángel,  in Jilotepec, México.