Tag Archives: Mexican Food

Rosca de Reyes – A Slice of Gospel and Tradition #Recipe

 

Photo Courtesy of "El Deleite".

Photo Credit:  “El Deleite”.

Often used as evangelizing tools, celebrations in Mexico feature elements that are charged with symbolism. Take the piñata, for example, used as an allegory of sin (colorful and appealing on the outside, yet hollow and empty on the inside). Still today, during parties, people are blindfolded (a nod to faith being blind) when facing the piñata, which will yield fruits once fought and defeated.

The Rosca de Reyes (cake of kings) is no exception. Even as I type, kids who have been taught to expect the arrival of the three kings or magi, during Epiphany have already gone to bed with the hopes of finding gifts by their shoes when they awake. This festivity marks the culmination of the “12 Days of Christmas”.

Rosca de Reyes is shaped and decorated as if it were a crown. Inside, little figurines representing baby Jesus while in hiding from Herod can be found. Whomever discovers  the figurine it their slice of rosca gets to share their good fortune- they will buy tamales for the group on February 2nd, to celebrate the presentation of Christ at the temple.

Without even knowing it, tradition is celebrated and perpetuated in a delicious slice that is typically enjoyed with a cup of hot chocolate.

Yanet Hernández Tabiel, owner of “El Deleite”, a bakery in Mexico City, shared her popular recipe with La Vitamina T readers.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp of yeast
  • 5 1/2 cups of flour
  • 1/2 cup of sugar
  • 1 tbsp of vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup of milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup of butter
  • 1 1/2 cups of crystallized fruit
  • 1/2 cup of warm water
  • 5 plastic “muñequitos de rosca” (plastic rosca dolls). These can be substituted with large beans.

For the butter crumble:

  • 1 cup of butter
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract

Instructions:

  1. Combine the yeast with one of the tablespoons of flour and the warm water. Let rest for 1o mins. or until it’s foamy
  2. Combine the remaining flour with the sugar, vanilla extract, salt and milk in a mixing bowl. Mix until incorporated. Add the eggs and the yolks.
  3. Continue mixing until smooth. Add the yeast and mix until you have a smooth, and flexible ball.
  4. Add the butter and continue mixing until fully incorporated.
  5. Add the mix in a bowl and cover it with a damp cloth. Keep at room temperature until it doubles in volume.
  6. Make a dimple with your finger and knead.
  7. Extend the dough into a rectangular shape, add the crystallized fruit and the plastic dolls. Twirl to form a crown shape.

Crumble and Decoration

  1. Mix the butter with the sugar, eggs and the vanilla extract
  2. Decorate the rosca with strips of this mix.
  3. Glaze your rosca with the eggwash and decorate it with crystallized fruits
  4. Bake for an hour at 375 degrees or until golden brown

Enjoy!

 

Pair your “Pavo” like a Pro – Cava Córdova’s Head Winemaker Shows you How

Winemaker Fernando Farías Córdova will launch Cava Córdova in 2015 Photo: Cava Córdova

Winemaker Fernando Farías Córdova Photo: Cava Córdova GSM

From the Series “World Class: Mexican Wine and the Hands who Make it”

 

Update: Cava Córdova has since launched.  Find more about them on their website

Mexican entrepreneur and winemaker Fernando Farías Córdova  followed his love for winemaking all the way from his native Jalisco to Valle de Guadalupe. Impressively,  although barely thirty, this young wine and tea sommelier is now making a living out of his passion, and is preparing to release his own wine label.

Sleeping in a cellar awaiting for its 2015 debut, is Cava Córdova GSM. Originally from the southern Rhône Valley, here, this blend of Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre grapes is being nurtured to become a wine that is both elegant and approachable.

It is impossible to resist asking an expert how to pair your food. Just in time for the Thanksgiving meal, Farías Córdova gives us tips for every palate:


White 
Look for wines with low acidity and high floral or fruit notes to highlight the flavor of cranberry sauce, such as wines made with Viognier, or Riesling grapes. A Moscato is a great option as long as it is not too sweet; and the butter notes of an oak-aged California Chardonnay would complement rich dishes very well.

Rosée
Dry, medium-bodied and very fruity wines will offer a refreshing contrast to pair elaborate dishes. Look for wines made with Grenache, Syrah or Carignan grapes

Red 
Red wine and turkey? Absolutely. Long gone are the times where poultry was usually only accompanied with white wine. Serve young red wines with notes of red fruit, jam and spices that intensify the flavors of our dishes. Look for Merlot, Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, Malbec or Syrah.

Sparkling
For a night of celebration, chose to pair your pecan pie with a Proseco Brut. Sparkling wines are also a great complement to spicy foods (in case mole or tamales verdes find their way to your table) and, why not, go ahead and pop that bottle of champagne that you were saving for a special occasion. This is one of them.

How do you know what wine is best for you? It is the one you like… and hopefully, it is wine from Valle de Guadalupe.

¡Salud!

 

Stay tuned for an update on the 2015 release of Cava Córdova GSM.

 

 

Prior articles in the series:

< AlXimia: The Art and Science of Extraordinary Wine

<¡´Biba´México! The Zeal Behind Mexico´s Pasión Biba  

< World Class: Mexican Wine and the Hands who Make it (Introduction to a Series)

 Originally published on 11-25-14

 

You Say Turkey, I Say Guajolote – Two Worlds, One Plate

Photo credit: Lissette Storch – Puebla, México

My great-grandma Rachel ¨Rae¨ Storch, who was born and raised in  the U.S., always called us on Thanksgiving Day. In one occasion, I visited her during the holidays in her home in Miami. To celebrate, she treated me to a very nice meal and asked me what we usually did for Thanksgiving in Mexico. “We have no Mayflower!” I remember answering. Grandma seemed stunned for a second, and then agreed that it made sense that this celebration was not part of my emotional repertoire. I also told her that with our public transportation system as it was, I was reminded to be thankful quite often, especially when getting off a ‘combi’ or ‘pesero’ (vans or shuttle buses that zigzag through the city at incredible speeds and stop at random). Without even blinking,  my great-grandma, who was always worried about my being too short or too skinny, then asked me if my parents were making me drink enough milk and if I took vitamins… I was 24.

For a while, shortly after I first moved to the U.S., and since I did not have family to celebrate with, I volunteered to be the one on call at work. Little by little, I have found myself participating in the festivity more and more often. After all, “en tierra que fueres haz lo que vieres*”. Besides, I can always make an argument for a party at the prospect of good food, and I have even added my on twist to it.

To celebrate this year, I am sharing  two turkey-centric recipes- one in English to make orange tequila turkey, and one in Spanish for those interested in recreating the delicious mole de guajolote otomí, which is usually reserved for fiestas patronales (parties to celebrate patron saints). Any of these two delicious meals will have you saying gobble, gobble in two languages!

*Popular saying equivalent to: “When in Rome do what the Romans do”.

Originally published on 11/25/2013 

Con M de Mujer: La Cocina Mexicana en Chicago

Tres famosas chefs presentan lo mejor de su gastronomía en el restaurante Tzuco, del chef Carlos Gaytán en Chicago

POR MARICHUY GARDUÑO

Recientemente el restaurante Tzuco, del famoso chef Carlos Gaytán,  el primer mexicano en obtener una estrella Michelin, recibió en “La Ciudad de los Vientos”  a las talentosas chefs mexicanas Celia Florián, del restaurante Las Quince Letras, en Oaxaca; Liz Galicia, de Miel de Agave en Puebla; y Diana Dávila, de Mi Tocaya Antojería, en Chicago Illinois.

Liz Galicia es una joven chef que siempre ha estado muy orgullosa de su estado. Por ello, le gusta mostrar toda la riqueza culinaria de su tierra natal. Liz estudió en Puebla y uno de sus objetivos siempre ha sido trabajar por su estado, pues le gusta la comida tradicional.

“A mí me tocó hacer las entradas calientes. Para la ocasión preparé un dúo de tamalitos: uno era de chivo de matanza con una reducción de mole de caderas; y el otro era de salsa verde con cerdo y verdolagas”, describe Galicia.

Foto: Tzuco. Tomada de la cuenta de Instagram de la chef Celia Florián

Liz comenta que para ella fue muy significativo presentarse en estas cenas, ya que era un menú en honor a la festividad de Día de Muertos que se realiza en México y es muy importante que los extranjeros conozcan un poco de nuestras tradiciones y que los mexicanos que viven allá recuerden sus raíces.

“Creo que es una de las festividades mexicanas, relacionadas con la gastronomía, más importantes que tenemos. Y los tamales son un ícono de las ofrendas”, sostiene la chef.

La cocinera mexicana añade que lo único que llevó a Chicago para la preparación de sus tamales fue la carne de chivo que llevaba empacado al alto vacío, de ahí en fuera todo se consiguió allá.

“Guajes, cilantro, verdolagas, chile costeño, guajillo y de árbol, en fin, todos los ingredientes el chef Carlos Gaytán me los facilitó, sin problemas”, relata Galicia.

OAXACA SIEMPRE PRESENTE

Foto: Tzuco. Tomada de la cuenta de Instagram de la chef Celia Florián

Celia Florián es una ardua promotora de la cocina oaxaqueña. Ella nació en Zimatlán de Álvarez, Oaxaca y lleva años cocinando los mejores platillos típicos de México.

Para esta ocasión, Florián, quien es delegada del Conservatorio de la Cultura Gastronómica Mexicana, así como fundadora y líder del Convivim Slow Food Oaxaca, preparó para los comensales de Tzuco un mole negro con guajolote, una verdadera delicia que complació hasta los paladares más exigentes.

“El mole tuvo una reacción increíble por parte de los asistentes a las cenas en Tzuco. Había muchos mexicanos y no mexicanos. El primer día que servimos el mole fue una verdadera locura”, expresa Florián.

La chef, quien también es presidenta de las Cocineras Tradicionales de Oaxaca, agrega que llevó suficiente pasta de mole preparada para el evento. Sin embargo, en la primera cena se acabó más de la mitad.

“Afortunadamente en Chicago hay muchos mexicanos, por lo que no fue difícil conseguir los ingredientes para preparar más pasta”, comenta la cocinera mexicana.

Para Florián fue un verdadero honor poder presentar la cocina de Oaxaca fuera de las fronteras “realmente fue muy emocionante”, puntualiza la chef mexicana.

 

Entrada de la chef Diana Dávila. Foto: Tzuco. Tomada de la cuenta de Instagram de la chef Celia Florián

El menú fue maridado con vinos de la vinícola “El Cielo” en Valle de Guadalupe.

¡Llegaron las ánimas! – Los Fieles Difuntos están de fiesta y disfrutarán de un bollo elaborado en su honor: el pan de muerto

 

Foto: Bertha Herrera

POR MARICHUY GARDUÑO/ FOTOS: BERTHA HERRERA

 

Como cada año la Catrina llegó
Y la fecha se cumplió
Porque a tú mesa muy puntual llegó
Contenta con la fiesta muy galana se presentó
Y a todos invitaba muy contenta a quien la visitó
Pasen, pasen decía, vengan todos a comer
Y un rico pan de muertos disfrutó.

 

El pan de muerto dulce, esponjoso, adornado con cuatro o más canillas y espolvoreado con azúcar blanca o solferina es una delicia de temporada. Este es preparado de harina de trigo, manteca, agua de azahar, raspadura de naranja y anís. Se trata de una especialidad que no puede faltar en las ofrendas mexicanas.

Por ello, no es raro ver dibujadas, en las vitrinas de las panaderías de México, a las Catrinas sentadas a la mesa comiendo gustosas su delicioso pan de muerto.

Sin duda, un antojo irresistible cuando se sopea con una taza humeante de chocolate, elaborado ya sea con leche o agua.

En el texto El Pan Nuestro de Cada Día, editado por la Cámara Nacional de la Industria Panificadora (Canainpa), se menciona que en varios estados de la República Mexicana se hacen los panes de diferentes formas, entre los que destacan: ánimas, vírgenes, borregos, conejos, campesinos, sombreros, flores y calaveras, entre otras.

VERSATILIDAD CULINARIA

Actualmente, estos bollos tradicionales son elaborados de forma muy original y con rellenos que van desde nata, cajeta, arándanos, hasta flores comestibles.

Por ejemplo, la chef Ana María Arroyo, del restaurante El Tajín en la Ciudad de México, hace un pan de muerto de harina mezclada con flores de cempasúchil.

“Esta flor era abundante en la parte central de México en la época prehispánica. Actualmente, es símbolo significativo para adornar ofrendas y tumbas en la celebración a los Fieles Difuntos”, expresa Arroyo.

La chef agrega que “la flor de los 20 pétalos”, es extremadamente aromática y de sabor fuerte, además de poseer un llamativo color anaranjado. Por ello, se debe de emplear en la cocina con mucho cuidado.

“Al usar los pétalos de esta flor se tiene que retirar el pistilo, porque si lo dejamos puede amargar. Al probarlo en la preparación del pan se percibe un sabor a naranja muy persistente”, enfatiza la chef.

La chef menciona que la tradición de Día de Muertos en México es algo que todos presenciamos, ya que es una forma de recordar a nuestros seres queridos que ya no están entre nosotros.

“El pan tiene la forma del ánima que se espera, comérselo es la máxima expresión de la comunicación con lo sagrado”, puntualiza la chef.

Encuentra una receta para hacer pan de muerto aquí.

Para deleite de nuestros lectores, tenemos el placer de presentar a nuestras nuevas colaboradoras, la periodista Marichuy Garduño y la fotógrafa Bertha Herrera. Encuentren más sobre estas pioneras del periodismo gastronómico en México en su página www.conapetito.com.mx 

Marichuy Garduño

Periodista gastronómica con 25 años de experiencia. Ha trabajado en los suplementos culinarios de los diarios más importantes de México como Buena Mesa, Reforma; Menú impreso y Online, de El Universal. Actualmente es editora de Pimienta, Excélsior.

A lo largo de su carrera, Marichuy ha entrevistado a varias personalidades del medio gastronómico, de la política y la literatura, entre los que destacan Enrique Olvera, Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, Alicia Gironella, Massimo Bottura, Gastón Acurio, Alex Atala, Robert Mondavi, Carlos Monsiváis, Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas, Elena Poniatowska y Jacobo Zabludovsky entre otros.

 

Bertha Herrera

Comunicóloga de profesión, fotógrafa por convicción. Chilanga de nacimiento, oaxaqueña de corazón. Adicta a  capturar  imágenes, a resaltar las texturas de las cosas y de las personas. A lo largo de 23 años ha retratado grandes personajes vinculados con la gastronomía, la arquitectura, la moda, el diseño, la cultura, se ha especializado en la fotografía gastronómica, tomando cursos de food styling en en el Culinary de Nueva York.

Ha trabajado en dos de los periódicos más importantes de México como son El Reforma y El Universal, y ha colaborado para  revistas relacionadas con estilos de vida, como El Gourmet, Chilango, In Style, Ha sido testigo de la transformación que ha habido dentro de la gastronomía mexicana. Para su lente han posado iconos de la cocina mexicana como Carmen Ramírez Degollado, Patricia Quintana, Alicia Gironella,  Giorgio D´ Angeli, Mónica Patiño y grandes cocineras tradicionales como Abigail Mendoza, Deyanira Aquino, Benedicta  Alejo. También destacados chefs como Ferran Adrià, René Redzepi , Joan Roca, Massimo Botura  Juan Mari Arzac , e infinidad de personajes famosos del mundo del espectáculo, la moda, la arquitectura, la cultura.

Como dice la canción  “veinte años no es nada”, pero para ella han sido un cúmulo de experiencia en el ha conocido y viajado. Bertha ha hecho la fotografía para tres libros relacionados con la gastronomía. El libro acerca del chile es el que más emoción le ha causado.

 

 

 

Death is a Party: El Día de Muertos

  

“The Mexican is familiar with death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, and celebrates it. It is one of his favorite playthings and his most steadfast love.”   

-Octavio Paz

Photos: Lissette Storch – Puebla, Mexico

 

Death is a verb and a noun.

In Mexico, death is an ultimate experience of life, and in what seems to be a constant attempt to make it look approachable, we have made her look human and we have dressed her up; we have given her nicknames, le hablamos de tú*.

Death is a ‘she’.

Originally, sugar skulls were created as a reminder of the fact that death  awaits us at any turn, and it is one of  the many expressions of our inevitable relationship with “the lady with many names”: La Catrina (“the rich or elegant one”), La Tía de las Muchachas (“the girls’ aunt”), La Fría (“the cold one”), La Novia Blanca (“the white bride”). Death is a character that wanders amongst us.

Death is life.

Like any other Mexican celebration, food is at the center of el Día de Muertos. Along with pan de muerto (literally, “bread of dead”) and cempasúchil flowers, sugar skulls are staples of this festivity. It is virtually impossible to stumble upon any particular element of  el Día de Muertos that does not have a deliberate purpose or meaning. From the bread that symbolizes the circle of life and communion with the body of the dead, to the flowers that make a nod to the ephemeral nature of life, this ritual, especially in rural Mexico, is rich in both form and content.

I grew up in the city, and for the most part, I participated in these festivities as a spectator. It was not until my grandmother died a few years ago, when my uncle and my mother took over perpetuating this three-thousand-year-old tradition, that I became involved and more intrigued by it.

Year after year, the family travels to a small village in the outskirts of Puebla to  set up an ofrenda for my grandmother, my great-grandmother, and other deceased  relatives. They are remembered with their favorite food and dishes. My grandmother  for example, loved to cook, so aside from prepared meals, her favorite kitchen tools are also set around her picture.

Candles are used either as symbol of hope and faith, or as a way to light the path of the dead as they descend. Water is included to quench the thirst of the souls, and as a symbol of purity. With these ofrendas, the dead  are remembered and invoked.

The celebration continues in the cemetery, where the living and the souls eat together, listen to music, and even enjoy fireworks.

For a few days in November, in Mexico, death is a party.

The cementery of San Francisco Acatepec, where my grandmother is buried.

Hablar de tú‘ means to address someone casually, vs. the respectfully ‘usted’ that is reserved to address those who you don’t know or those who haven’t granted you permission to do otherwise.

 

5 Tips de 5 Papás para la Parrillada Perfecta #DíadelPadre

 

Hasta aquí en las latitudes más septentrionales, desafiando el clima que no se decide completamente a cambiar de estación,  las parrillas ya están a todo lo que dan. Para ayudarlos a prepararse para el Día del Padre, hemos consultado con varios papás expertos en parrilladas. Aquí les compartimos cinco de los tips que más nos gustaron para que usted los ponga en práctica.

Tip 1.  Los mejores cortes de carne para asar son los cortes  marmoleados con o sin hueso. Es decir, aquellos en los que la grasa se encuentra distribuida en la carne. Fíjese que este sea el caso cuando la compre, o pídale a su carnicero que le ayude.  Uno de nuestros papás, carnicero por más de 60 años, nos recomienda que asemos cortes como el rib eye, el porterhouse y el T-bone. Ahora que si la fiesta va a estar concurrida y necesita estrechar el presupuesto, pida tri-tip, un corte muy famoso en California. Este corte es bueno, bonito y barato.  Sí va a asar este tipo de carne,  aunque parezca abundante, no lo corte hasta que esté listo para servirse.

Tip 2. Los cortes más delgados quedan menos suaves al asar. Considere marinarlos antes de ponerlos a la parrilla. Esto aplica también para el pollo.

Tip 3. Si tiene una parrilla de carbón, cree dos áreas con dos intensidades diferentes. Entre más alta la pila de carbón, más intenso el fuego y más fácil será quemar la comida. Puede usar el área de mayor intensidad para sellar la carne. Gire la carne 45 grados para hacerle marcas en a parrilla. Cocine la carne a término en el área de menor intensidad.

Tip 4. Espere a asar su comida hasta que el carbón esté blanco. Si comienza a cocinar antes de que el fuego alcance su mayor intensidad, su comida sabrá a combustible.

Tip 5. Si cocina su carne en brochetas, considere alternarla con fruta como piña o manzanas. Las mejores manzanas para asar son las Granny Smith por su sabor y textura. Otra idea que nos encantó es la de poner tomates cherry al final de sus brochetas. Cuando la piel del tomate empieza a pelarse, es un buen indicador de que la carne está lista.

Pasa a visitar nuestra tienda en línea si quieres cocinar con una sal mexicana deliciosa la Sal de San Felipe

¡Feliz Día del Padre!

 

 

Metate: Seis Generaciones de Herencia Culinaria

Foto: Fabi Rosas/Abrahám Tamez

POR: MARICHUY GARDUÑO FOTOS: FABI ROSAS/ABRAHÁM TAMEZ

No cabe duda que los hijos cambian la vida de todo ser humano, así lo piensa el orgulloso Abrahám Tamez, chef y propietario del restaurante “Metate“, en Los Cabos, Baja California Sur.

Cariño, orgullo y el mejor regalo que le ha dado la vida es ser papá. Tamez dice que nunca se imaginó que tener hijos lo podría llenar de tanta alegría y gozo.

“Antes pensaba que mi profesión era lo mejor que había sucedido. Sin embargo, creo el ser padre es una bendición absoluta”, dice el chef, con un enorme júbilo.

Agrega que su hijo se llama Mateo y apenas cuenta con un año y medio de edad. Con él pasa horas maravillosas que no cambiaría por nadie, ni por nada.

“Mi hijo es un mini yo. Me siento el papá más orgulloso, porque ya cocina; por ejemplo, lo siento a un lado de mí y se pone súper concentrado, me ayuda a moverle a los guisos y pasarme los ingredientes. Es un pequeño gourmet, ya que prueba de todo, come, pato, pescado e incluso picante”, comenta Tamez, quien sueña con que su hijo siga sus pasos y eventualmente se convierta en su colega. 

Foto: Abrahám Tamez

 Y aunque el chef nunca pensó en tener hijos, ahora dice que es lo más bonito que le ha sucedido en su vida.   “Puedo decir que mi hijo me ha vuelto totalmente loco. No puedo describir el sentimiento que me da Mateo”, expresa con gran alegría el chef.

EL METATE HEREDADO

El profesional en artes culinarias, quien heredó la pasión por la cocina de su abuela materna Fausta Río Tamez, nos dice orgulloso que su restaurante se llama “Metate” justo en honor a ella.

“Crecí al lado de mi abuela, ella hacia tortillas a mano. De hecho, siempre estaba moliendo en el metate. Le gustaba preparar toda la cocina clásica, desde tacos de cabeza, tuétano y espaldilla, por mencionar algunos guisos”, dice Tamez, quien considera que la cocina es un lenguaje que expresa creatividad, felicidad, amor, pasión, belleza y poesía.

El chef agrega, que otra razón para ponerle “Metate” a su restaurante, fue porque a su abuela Fausta se lo heredó de su abuelita y está a su vez se lo heredada a él.

“Este metate lleva seis generaciones en la familia. Es un utensilio de cocina al que le tenemos un aprecio muy grande”, comenta el chef, quien es originario de Morelia, Michoacán y vivió en la Ciudad de México, pero desde hace 13 años se encuentra radicado en Los Cabos, lugar del que dice se encuentra enamorado.

Añade que en “Metate” se ofrece un concepto de cocina de mercado. La clásica comida que se encuentra en los mercados de todo México y en sus calles. 

“Es como street food. Por ejemplo, tenemos en la carta, tortillas hechas a mano, tacos de chicharrón, huarache y esquites, entre otros”, enfatiza.

Pero su ejecución es innegablemente elevada y artística, y su concepto es un farm-to-table muy contemporáneo llevado a su máxima expresión, ya  que en realidad el huerto está muy cerca de la mesa. Tan cerca, que incluso los comensales son invitados a elegir algunos ingredientes para sus alimentos.

“Metate” sobresale  como opción entre los tradicionales tacos de ceviche y tostadas tan populares en la región, y se suma con fuerza a la propuesta gastronómica que recientemente ha colocado a Los Cabos como un destino culinario con su propia personalidad.

El restaurante no tiene página web, pero encuentra su dirección y haz reservaciones a través de su página de Facebook.

Para deleite de nuestros lectores, tenemos el placer de presentar a nuestras colaboradoras, la periodista Marichuy Garduño y la fotógrafa Bertha Herrera. Encuentren más sobre estas pioneras del periodismo gastronómico en México en su página www.conapetito.com.mx 

Marichuy Garduño

Periodista gastronómica con 25 años de experiencia. Ha trabajado en los suplementos culinarios de los diarios más importantes de México como Buena Mesa, Reforma; Menú impreso y Online, de El Universal. Actualmente es editora de Pimienta, Excélsior.

A lo largo de su carrera, Marichuy ha entrevistado a varias personalidades del medio gastronómico, de la política y la literatura, entre los que destacan Enrique Olvera, Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, Alicia Gironella, Massimo Bottura, Gastón Acurio, Alex Atala, Robert Mondavi, Carlos Monsiváis, Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas, Elena Poniatowska y Jacobo Zabludovsky entre otros.

Bertha Herrera

Comunicóloga de profesión, fotógrafa por convicción. Chilanga de nacimiento, oaxaqueña de corazón. Adicta a  capturar  imágenes, a resaltar las texturas de las cosas y de las personas. A lo largo de 23 años ha retratado grandes personajes vinculados con la gastronomía, la arquitectura, la moda, el diseño, la cultura, se ha especializado en la fotografía gastronómica, tomando cursos de food styling en en el Culinary de Nueva York.

Ha trabajado en dos de los periódicos más importantes de México como son El Reforma y El Universal, y ha colaborado para  revistas relacionadas con estilos de vida, como El Gourmet, Chilango, In Style, Ha sido testigo de la transformación que ha habido dentro de la gastronomía mexicana. Para su lente han posado iconos de la cocina mexicana como Carmen Ramírez Degollado, Patricia Quintana, Alicia Gironella,  Giorgio D´ Angeli, Mónica Patiño y grandes cocineras tradicionales como Abigail Mendoza, Deyanira Aquino, Benedicta  Alejo. También destacados chefs como Ferran Adrià, René Redzepi , Joan Roca, Massimo Botura  Juan Mari Arzac , e infinidad de personajes famosos del mundo del espectáculo, la moda, la arquitectura, la cultura.

Como dice la canción  “veinte años no es nada”, pero para ella han sido un cúmulo de experiencia en el ha conocido y viajado. Bertha ha hecho la fotografía para tres libros relacionados con la gastronomía. El libro acerca del chile es el que más emoción le ha causado.

 

Let There Be Fire! – The Universal Language of Grilling

Chimney starters help accelerate the process of getting the coal ready for grilling.  
Photo credit: Illya Samko

 

Summer is finally here, and in these latitudes, barbecue season often evokes images of sporting events and patriotic-themed cookouts. Of course, you need weather to cooperate, so as the words “barbecue” roll off your tongue, you have unconsciously summoned the idea of a picture-perfect day. Growing up in a part of the world blessed with rather benign weather year-round, it was not until I moved to Chicago that I understood why the state of the atmosphere often finds its way into the conversation or the news. Here, grilling is definitely a seasonal event and sometimes it is referred to as barbecuing.

In Mexico, barbecue or barbacoa, means something different- it is a dish that typically entails cooking meat on an open fire (usually lamb) in a hole that has been dug in the ground for this purpose. Barbecuing to us, is a parrillada or a carne asada (literally, “grilled meat”). These words immediately make me think of a Sunday spent surrounded by family and friends in Mexico. Putting the meat on the grill is the main event, and the process entails an unspoken ritual that, like any other party in Mexico, takes at least a whole day. To me, the most curious part of the custom is what is often done in hopes that the rain won’t spoil the day- scissors and knives are staked into the ground. In some instances, this is done forming specific shapes, in others, these artifacts are put outside along with ribbons or even eggs…

Last year, we asked a few suburban dads for their grilling tips right on time for Father’s Day. As I asked around, I realized that ideas were incredibly diverse-  from ingredients to techniques. Something I found particularly fascinating was that no matter who I was talking to, this conversation resonated.  The joy of grilling seemed universal.

Is it? I think it might be. I asked my friend Illya for a few grilling tips. He happens to be Ukrainian and someone who, like me, is truly passionate about food. What do you have in common? You speak the same language-  He is another guy who loves to grill.

Sizzling Hot: Our Primal Love for Food over Fire

 By: Illya Samko

 

Grilling in Monterrey, Mexico. Photo credit: Illya Samko

Grilling in Monterrey, Mexico. Photo credit: Illya Samko

Since man started cooking with fire, food has never been the same. There is something deeply primal about putting a piece of steak on the fire; the sound of  meat sizzling on the grill, its aroma and the divine taste of a fresh steak. I believe these images are seared into our DNA.

In the Ukraine, grilling is mainly associated with cooking pork. Pork shoulder is usually cut into cubes and marinated in mayonnaise, salt and onions. It is then skewered and cooked over charcoal slowly until it is well done.

Ukrainian grill. Photo credit: Ilya Samko

Ukrainian grill. Photo credit: Illya Samko

My greatest learning experience as far as grilling goes, took place during my first trip to Monterrey, Mexico (birthplace of my lovely wife, Myrna). Here, grilling  is a way of life to say the least. I was impressed with how Regios* know their grilling. They use a specific type of charcoal, Mesquite, which gives the meat a very smoky and distinctive flavor. The preparation process is as important as grilling itself- It takes a certain number of cheves** to get the thing going. First the fire, then the botanas*** and few hours later, when you are so hungry that you could eat just about anything, you finally hear that “magic sound” and smell the beef- you are lovestruck.

 At that point, in spite of all the beers you’ve had, your senses are heightened and the level of salivation is downright dangerous. Finally, the teasing is over and it is time to feast- the plate full of grilled goodness makes it to the table. Devour you will. Believe me. Not only is grilling a ritual that takes hours, it is also a way to celebrate anything. Mexicans seem to celebrate life if there is no other particular reason to party.

When grilling there are a few important things that you need to know. I believe these basic steps make a huge difference.

  • Never put any meat on the grill that came straight out from the fridge. Let it warm up a little. Room temperature is ideal.
  • Season your meat with kosher or sea salt and pepper. Good steak needs absolutely nothing else.
  • Be patient. You cannot rush a good burger, steak or whatever you are grilling.
  • After you take your steak off the grill, let it rest for about five minutes. This will allow all the juices to be redistributed back into the steak evenly.
  • I use a chimney starter to speed up the process of getting the coal ready for grilling. Using accelerators on the coal gives your food  a chemical taste.

Enjoy!

Born and raised in Western Ukraine, Illya Samko is a food enthusiast who loves to travel, learn about different cultures and try new cuisines. With a  degree in law, and a knack for anthropology, Illya has worked in London, New York and Chicago, where he currently lives with his Mexican wife, Myrna. 

 
*Regios short for regiomontanos, are a citizens from Monterrey, Mexico.
**Cheves is slang for cerveza or beer.
***Appetizers, snacks
 
Originally published 6-23-2013 www.lavitaminat.com 

Para este Día del Amor y la Amistad, una #Receta “Visceral”: Morcilla

Foto: Manuel Rivera para La Vitamina T

Foto: Manuel Rivera para La Vitamina T


En un día en el que se celebra al “corazón” el chef Aldo Saavedra, nos conquista a través del estómago con un ángulo divertidísimo: vísceras y sangre. De sus viajes por México, y directamente de la sierra de Amula en Jalisco, el chef Saavedra trae a “Nuestra Mesa” una extraordinaria receta para hacer morcilla.

La morcilla es un embutido hecho a base de sangre coagulada y sazonada con diversas hierbas frescas.  Según el chef Saavedra, el nombre y los ingredientes de la morcilla, varian de acuerdo al país y la región en la que uno se encuentre. Desde “moronga”, “prieta en chile”, hasta “sangrecita” y “rellena”, su elaboración es igualmente diversa. Ésta incluye sangre de distintos animales, granos, hierbas frescas, semillas, chiles, y especias.

Algunas referencias ubican a Grecia como el punto de origen de este embutido, y  se especula que aquí era originalmente preparada con sangre de cordero. En España, donde se se generalizó el uso de la carne de cerdo, se cree que la morcilla era un plato propio de comunidades de escasos recursos que deseaban aprovechar todo el animal. Una vez que la receta llega a México, se incorporaron ingredientes locales. Aquí, la “moronga” uno de los nombre con el que se le conoce en este país, se sirve en trozos o guisada con chile, cebolla, ajo y jitomate; en caldillo o incluso, frita. En Yucatán, por ejemplo, este plato suele rellenarse  con sesos, carne y vísceras de cerdo, y se sirve frita acompañada con chicharrón y frijoles. En la comunidades otomíes este plato se cocina de diferente forma:  con sangre de pollo embutida en sus tripas y en caldillo de chiles secos. Si se hace de cerdo, el plato usualmente incluye un trenza de tripas de cerdo fritas.

¡Anímate a prepararlo! “Haz de tripas corazón”.

INGREDIENTES

  • 2 cebollas chicas frescas con rabo picadas
  • 1 rama de yerbabuena picada
  • 1 rama de perejil picado
  • 3 ajos picados
  • 4 hojas de laurel
  • 1 ramita de mejorana u orégano fresco
  • La cáscara de 2 limas o naranjas picadas
  • 2 chiles cuaresmeños picados
  • 500 gramos de tripa de cerdo, lavada y picada
  • 50 gramos de manteca de cerdo
  • 2 litros de sangre de cerdo fresca
  • 3 cucharadas de vinagre blanco
  • Tripas del cerdo para embutir
  • Sal y pimienta al gusto

PROCESO

  1. Agrega el vinagre y la sal a la sangre para que no se cuaje.
  2. Pon las tripas bien lavadas a remojar en agua con limón y un poco de vinagre
  3. Saltea en manteca, la cebolla, el ajo, los chiles, el perejil y las hierbas de olor.
  4. Añade la tripa picada, sazona con sal y pimienta  y deja enfriar.
  5. Añade la mezcla de tripa a la sangre, e incorpora bien.
  6. Saca la tripa de su remojo y sécala bien. Haz un nudo en uno de los extremos.
  7. Llena la tripa con la sangre. Pícala un poco para que no reviente.
  8. Cuéce en una olla con agua durante aproximadamente 45 minutos o hasta que esté firme.
  9. Saca del agua, pon a secar y deja enfriar colgada.
  10. Si no quieres embutirla, ya que tienes el recaudo de tripas listo, añade la sangre y cocina todo junto.

¡Que la disfruten!

image2 (1)

Chef Aldo SaavedraEl chef Aldo Saavedra ha cocinado para huéspedes de establecimientos como el conocido Hotel Condesa D.F. y ha contribuído con sus recetas en proyectos con marcas de la talla de Larousse y Danone. En Nuestra Mesa, el chef Saavedra comparte con los lectores de La Vitamina T, su pasión por la cocina y por México. Encuentra más información sobre el chef Saavedra en RutaAlma